Pfizer envisions a COVID-19 booster shot 12 months after getting vaccinated

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The two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine will be ready to release its third booster shot by the fall, CBS News reported.

"If it turns out (to last) a year or a year and a half, we very well may need to get booster shots to keep up the level of protection". "There will be a need, based on this data, for re-vaccinations", he said, noting that the exact timing of those boosters, and how frequently they might need to occur, remains unclear. Read on to find out-and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Signs Your Illness is Actually Coronavirus in Disguise.

The US is preparing for the possibility booster shots will be needed from between 9 months to a year of the first vaccine.

"A likely scenario is that there will be likely a need for a third dose, somewhere between six and 12 months and then from there, there will be an annual revaccination, but all of that needs to be confirmed", he said, adding that variants will play a "key role".

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) said around 90,000 pregnant women had been vaccinated in the United States, mainly with the two American vaccines, without any safety concerns being raised.

Pfizer was first to market in the USA with its BioNTech-partnered COVID-19 vaccine, and by and large, it's avoided the safety and supply concerns plaguing some of its pandemic peers.

Pfizer: Annual Covid-19 booster shots may become new normal
COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots May Be Needed Within A Year, US Officials Say

"We need to be careful about that six month number", said Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, in an interview earlier this week with MSNBC.

Pfizer published a study earlier this month that said its jab is more than 91 percent effective at protecting against the coronavirus, and more than 95 percent effective against severe cases of Covid-19 up to six months after the second dose.

According to Bancel, Moderna is working to have a vaccine that could potentially protect against COVID and the seasonal flu.

"The current thinking is those who are more vulnerable will have to go first", he said. SARS-CoV-2 seems to be mutating much slower than the flu, but several concerning variants have already emerged - which is why it's so important to generate immunity in as many people as possible. "We believe we can get to a high efficacy flu vaccine".

The agency said 129,494,179 people had received at least one dose while 82,471,151 people are fully vaccinated as of Saturday.

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