Governor Quickly Signs New Voting Restrictions

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President Biden released an extended statement, calling the law an attack on "good conscience" that denies the right to vote for "countless" Americans.

"This is Jim Crow in the 21st century", Biden said in a statement.

"I'd love to say I'm the last, but we know that isn't true", she said.

"It's an atrocity", Biden told reporters Friday, shortly after comparing the restrictions to racist laws that for decades kept Blacks from full voting rights.

Recently elected Georgia Senator Jon Ossoff tweeted out his support for Ms Cannon, suggesting she was charged with a felony unfairly, "For "knocking on Gov. Kemp's office door" as she tried to observe the cowardly closed-door signing ceremony for the voter suppression law".

Kemp, a Republican, was announcing the signing of the bill over a live stream when he was interrupted by Cannon, a Democrat. "We are witnessing right now, a kind of wrestling in the soul of Georgia". Rev. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga., in an interview Friday.

Those victories brought refocused attention on racial strains in Georgia, with its history of slavery and segregation and where Black people have faced decades of attempts to repress their votes.

Biden pressed for Congress to take action on two Democratic-sponsored bills meant to expand voting participation. The New Georgia Project, Black Voters Matter and Rise Inc. say the law violates the First and 14th Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, as well as parts of the federal Voting Rights Act that say states can not restrict Black voter participation.

It is expected to be a months-long slog in the narrowly divided Congress, specifically the Senate, where Democrats are, for now, unwilling to muscle their slim majority to change filibuster rules, despite the party's urgent calls for action. "I respect rules. but no Senate rule should overrule the integrity of our democracy". "They are choking what makes us distinct and unique on the planet Earth".

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"Voting is sacred. If they have to change the process to do that, that's fine", Butler said. He called as well for the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would restore some aspects of a landmark law struck down by the Supreme Court in 2013.

Trump's attacks were particularly severe in Georgia, after he became the first Republican presidential nominee to lose the state since 1992.

Just as Kemp and several white state lawmakers celebrated the signing of the state's new voting law on Thursday, state police officers handcuffed and forcibly removed state Rep. Park Cannon, a Black woman, after she knocked on the door of the governor's private office. Her charges carry a penalty of up to five years in prison. She was released late Thursday night.

Other Republican-controlled state legislatures are pursuing voting restrictions in election battleground states, including Florida and Arizona, after former President Donald Trump repeatedly blamed his loss to Biden on massive voter fraud without evidence. Voters would also have less time to apply for a mail ballot. "I understand he's trying to work across the aisle and get bipartisanship, but voting is sacred". He's well aware that this fight may go on for a while. "Hopefully, we will all emerge, in some way, stronger and better prepared for future challenges". "We just need the Democrats in the Senate to stand up". The bill was a watered-down version of some of the proposals considered by the GOP-led General Assembly.

"Among the outrageous parts of this new state law, it ends voting hours early so working people can't cast their vote after their shift is over". It also makes it a misdemeanor for people to offer food and water to voters waiting in line. It also addresses campaign financing and ethics laws.

McLeod explained how voters of color in Georgia have already had to put up with long lines, and she said these new laws would make things worse.

Throughout the legislative session, Republican lawmakers have promoted election reform as an effort to ensure fair and secure elections throughout the state. Will we go forward or will we go backwards?

"Jim Crow 2.0 is represented in that picture", Georgia lawmaker Donna McLeod told CNN.

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