BWS: Tropical Storm Is A "Threat To Bermuda"

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Forecasters said Paulette would become a hurricane later Saturday and drop up to 6 inches (15 centimeters) of rain on the territory through Monday, adding that it is expected to be a "dangerous hurricane" when it is near Bermuda on Sunday night and Monday. Nineteen is also moving west-northwest at 8 miles per hour. Some time today it probably will become Tropical Storm Sally.

A hurricane watch has gone into effect for Bermuda as Tropical Storm Paulette moved northward over the Central Atlantic on Saturday and should bring hazardous conditions to the British Overseas Territory by Sunday night.

Note: None of these storms pose a direct threat to New Jersey or other coastal areas along the eastern United States, but forecasters say Tropical Storm Paulette is generating swells that are causing rough seas.

Some slow development of this system is possible while this system moves westward and then south-westward over the northern and western Gulf of Mexico through early next week.

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Spaghetti models are in general agreement that Invest 96L will track westward across South Florida and emerge over the Gulf of Mexico.

The two most robust waves are off the west coast of Africa Saturday morning. The chances of development over the next five days is 30 per cent.

A new tropical system may affect South Arkansas weather early next week. This disturbance is a few hundred miles west of the Cabo Verde Islands and has odds for development up to 80% for the next 48 hours, and 90% for the next five days. We could see a continuation of a band of heavy rain on the outer edge of the circulation on Sunday that could extend into coastal areas of SWFL. Thankfully, it is far from us, so we have plenty of time to keep an eye on it.

As with all hurricanes and tropical systems, the worst impacts are always on the right side of the storm.

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