Facebook, Twitter Pausing Hong Kong Government Data Requests

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The list of offenses that could lead someone to be charged with a serious crime is wide-ranging, as the terrorism charge includes disrupting public transport, while the subversion charge includes preventing Chinese or Hong Kong government agencies from performing their duties, Sky News reports.

Last week, the Canadian government announced that it was suspending the Canada-Hong Kong extradition treaty in response to concerns over the passage of national security legislation for Hong Kong by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress of China. Facebook restricted 394 such pieces of content in Hong Kong in the second half of 2019, up from eight restrictions in the first half of the year. "We have a global process for government requests and in reviewing each individual request, we consider Facebook's policies, local laws and worldwide human-rights standards". The new law, they said, only targets a few "troublemakers". American officials have expressed fears that the new law signals Beijing's intention to take full control of Hong Kong, which has operated with more autonomy and freedom than cities on the mainland.

Joshua Wong, a prominent 23-year-old activist, called on the worldwide community Monday to "stand with" Hong Kong.

Last week, China's parliament passed sweeping new national security legislation for the semi-autonomous city, setting the stage for the most radical changes to the former British colony's way of life since it returned to Chinese rule 23 years ago. He was denied bail and remanded in custody.

The security law prohibits citizens from protesting for Hong Kong's independence.

"Recently, a certain base organization of the Hong Kong Forces has conducted multi-course coherent training", the Weibo post reads, according to Google Translate.

Annexation would represent a violation of global law: UKs Johnson warns Israel
Experts say there is evidence emerging that Netanyahu's desired roadmap for moving forward is at odds with Washington's. However, the plan has attracted criticism from the global community, which sees the settlements as illegal.

Separately, pro-democracy activists Agnes Chow, Joshua Wong and Ivan Lam also appeared in court Monday over charges related to a protest last June.

On Monday, China's London ambassador Liu also reacted to reports that the United Kingdom government was planning to ditch Huawei from building the British 5G internet network.

The cases will move to trial and sentencing following a pretrial review for Wong and Lam, which is scheduled for August 5.

In May, Hong Kong's chief executive Carrie Lam said that the police may be given greater powers to monitor social media.

Others held up blank pieces of paper as a sign of protest against the suppression of political protest in the city. "That's why we are using white paper instead".

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