Man survives 23 days in sub-zero temperatures after cabin burns down

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Dramatic footage has been released showing the moment Tyson Steele, from Utah, USA, was rescued by helicopter by Alaska State Troopers.

Tyson Steele, 30, survived for almost a month by constructing a make-shift shelter, eating partially charred canned goods, and stamping an "S.O.S." distress signal in the snow at his remote homestead roughly 70 miles northwest of Anchorage.

He added: "I grabbed everything that was on my bed".

"It was just big enough for my sleeping bags and me and a couple things of food", he said in a press release about the rescue.

Mr Steele is not sure exactly what night the fire started, as he has been living alone in the cabin since September.

"Honestly I was grateful that all my bullets blew up, because that could have been a temptation to be like 'I'm not gonna make it, ' and I put myself out, right?" Inside. And I thought he was not inside...

But as Steele sipped a tall McDonald's coffee, "he seemed happy to talk", the trooper said, "and certainly to have survived 22 or 23 days in the wilderness".

But when Steele went outside, he listened to Phil groaning- within. "I have no words for what sorrow - it was just. just a scream".

"Just a visceral - not angry, not sad, just like, that's all I could express - just scream". "Felt like I tore my lung out". By then, his plastic hut had become an inferno, as his 500 rounds of ammunition exploded. "Every shovel of snow that I throw on it - I'm hysterical trying to put it out and it's not doing anything".

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His first task was to make an inventory: he saved 60 cans, of which he knew he could survive 30 days by rationing two a day.

Eventually he got craftier, building a new makeshift shelter around the surviving wood stove with lumber scraps and scavenged tarps.

After his family members and friends had not heard from him for several weeks, they requested a welfare check.

"I say Phil:" Get out of here! He made the SOS signal in the snow, mapping it with the ash from the fire to make it stand apart, he stated. "And his nearest neighbor was 20 miles away, in the tiny community of Skwentna", Marsh noted."Steele's only way in or out of the wilderness was by air charter".

"It broke another rule that I had established for years, and that had to be strict in my weekly communication - call my parents and let them know I'm good", he complained. "So, I ran out of light".

Having to focus on his survival, Steele said that he was unsure if the waterways in the area would be frozen over enough to cross.

"I only have six hours of [daylight] travel".

An Alaska man whose remote cabin burned down in mid-December was rescued Friday by Alaska State Troopers.

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