Now attracting viewers: the election interview that Boris Johnson won't do

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Neil added: "There's no law, no Supreme Court ruling that can force Mr. Johnson to participate in a BBC leaders' interview". Oven-ready, as Mr Johnson likes to say'.

He was similarly tough on Jo Swinson, Nigel Farage and Nicola Sturgeon - but Mr Johnson appears to have ducked the chance to have his policies and record put under the microscope.

The stunt comes shortly after a new YouGov survey was published which announces that just under 7 in 10 Brits think the prime minister is obliged to sit down with Andrew Neil in an interview.

Former BBC editor David Elstein, who launched Channel 5, hit out at broadcasters" "sense of entitlement" and "generalised hostility' to politicians.

Labour shadow education secretary Angela Rayner tweeted a clip of Mr Neil's challenge, writing: "It's time to stop being a chicken Boris Johnson.' Speaking before the journalist had laid down the gauntlet, Mr Johnson told reporters yesterday: 'I'm the first prime minister to have done two, or about to do two one-on-one leadership debates, several hours" worth of phone-ins, endless press conferences and interviews with all sorts of BBC people called Andrew.

Mr Johnson appeared on the BBC's Andrew Marr present on Sunday after an preliminary stand-off with the BBC, and at this time he appeared on This Morning with Philip Schofield and Holly Willoughby.

He claimed broadcasters were sounding hysterical, and said Neil's words on Thursday were "pretty close to the edge".

But Channel 4 quickly realised the blunder and a spokesman said: "Boris Johnson says "people of talent" not "people of colour".

The watchdog's Election Committee said the prop "was not a representation of the Prime Minister personally", and that "little editorial focus was given to it, either visually or in references made by the presenter or debate participants".

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Labour escalated its ongoing criticism about BBC bias and permitting Johnson to "choose and select" his BBC platform, in an open letter to the BBC director common, Tony Corridor, on Thursday.

"And why, so many times in his career in journalism and politics, critics and sometimes even those near him have deemed him to be untrustworthy".

"It is not too late", Neil said in a monologue to the camera.

'It's, after all, related to what he's promising us all now. When almost 20,000 in his numbers are already working for the NHS. Can he be believed when he claims another 34 will be built in the five years after that? After inflation, the additional money promised amounts to £20bn.

Ian Lavery, Labour Party chairman, said: "Boris Johnson thinks he's born to rule and doesn't have to face scrutiny. But he vowed to the DUP, his Unionist allies in Northern Ireland, that there would never be a border down the Irish Sea", Neil said.

'He is working scared as a result of each time he's confronted with the affect of 9 years of austerity, the price of dwelling disaster and his plans to promote out our NHS, the extra he's uncovered'.

'That's as essential to the DUP because the NHS is to the remainder of us.

"It's a fantastic deal that will enable us to get Brexit done and move forward".

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