Houthis claim attacking Saudi border frontline, captureing troops

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This Saturday, June 16, 2018 file still image taken from video provided by Arab 24 shows Saudi-led forces gathering to retake the global airport of Yemen's rebel-held port city of Hodeida from the Shiite Houthi rebels.

He also claimed hundreds of Saudi soldiers lay dead or injured on the battlefield, and Riyadh had little option but to consider how to withdraw.

The Houthis said on September 20 they would halt missile and drone attacks on Saudi Arabia if the alliance stopped its operations.

Video showed armoured vehicles, some ablaze, with stenciled Saudi markings, along with large piles of weapons and ammunition the rebels say they seized.

The coalition, composed of Sunni Muslim countries in the region, joined Yemen's conflict in March 2015 to restore the country's internationally recognized government, which was driven out of Sanaa by the Shiite Houthis.

In an interview with Tehran's official IRNA news agency on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, Mohammad Javad Zarif accused the Saudi leadership of stirring up strife.

The Houthi-owned Al-Masirah television network on Sunday broadcast footage showing a long, snaking line of what the rebels said were captured troops walking in rugged terrain.

It comes as a brutal civil war rages in Yemen and has claimed more than 16,000 lives and left 13 million people on the brink of starvation.

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Despite the overwhelming military superiority of Saudi Arabia and the U.A.E., the war has turned into a quagmire.

Yemeni government troops, supported by coalition air strikes, have in recent months been fighting Houthi forces in the Kataf region of the northern Saada province near the Saudi border.

The Houthis, who had recently stepped up missile and drone attacks on Saudi cities, have claimed responsibility for the largest-ever attack on Saudi oil facilities on September 14.

On Saturday, the Houthis claimed they had captured three Saudi brigades - a major proportion of the kingdom's army.

Iran's foreign minister has urged arch-rival Saudi Arabia to accept that "security can not be bought", saying an end to the war in Yemen would quell regional tensions. Even so, both Riyadh and Washington blame the attacks on Iran, which has denied any involvement.

The Saudi-led coalition has yet to respond to the rebels' claims.

Saudi Arabia and Iran are locked in a decades-long struggle for regional dominance and back opposing sides in a bitter war that has pushed Yemen to the brink of starvation.

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