Promontory Pointe replat, site plan approved

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The Monument Board of Trustees approved a replat, and a second amendment, to the final planned development site plan for the Promontory Pointe subdivision.

The replot and amendment are for the upper two phases of Promontory Pointe located on the east side of Gleneagle Drive, and have to do with lot layout and street configuration.

The investor for Promontory Pointe has requested approval to provide a different lot layout for the remaining portion of the development that would be better suited to the topography.

Tom Kassawara, director of development services for the town of Monument, told the board of trustees during the April 1 meeting, that Classic Homes encountered steep slopes and grade changes that they would rather not deal with, when building. The slopes made it nearly impossible to build on.

The original site plan was approved in 2007. The original plan also had several streets coming off of Gleneagle Drive.

In addition to the slopes and grades, Kassawara said Classic Homes has modified their landscape plans in this area to reduce the amount of water that would be needed to irrigate the landscape.

He said sod will be replaced with native grass and water wise plants, rather than the species that were originally approved in 2007.

“With all of those changes we think it’s a better product. There are fewer streets coming out onto Gleneagle Drive which is a bonus because that’s pretty much going to wind up being a collector road someday, (because) it’s going to go north and south paralleling Jackson Creek Parkway,” Kassawara said. “With that and the new landscape plans we think it’s a much better plan than it was originally approved.”

Kassawara said the density has been dropped as well. Several lots had to be moved because the topography made it impossible to build.

“Changing the grades of the streets will make them a little bit safer. Changing the elevations of the lots will make them more buildable. Changing the landscape plan for the common areas and the trail area, is what’s going to save them the bulk of the water,” Kassawara said.