Three of Detained After Christchurch Shooting Have No Links to Attack

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Flanked by two police officers, he smirked when media persons photographed him during the hearing and was seen making the white power gesture, New Zealand Herald reported.

Key suspect Australian Brenton Harrison Tarrant, 28, has been charged with murder since March 16.

The man charged over Friday's twin mosque attacks in the New Zealand city of Christchurch is believed to have acted alone, police say. He liked to describe New Zealand as "a slice of paradise", according to his son.

Muzzammil Pathan arrived to offer his condolences for a friend, Imran Khan, who was killed at a second mosque in the suburb of Linwood. The gun had no shells in it, he said. "I still don't know where he is", she said.

The elder Rashid was a teacher in Christchurch and was from Abbottabad, Pakistan. Rashid's 21-year-old son, Talha, was also killed.

Police then rammed the gunman's vehicle and arrested him.

Two other people remain in custody, although their link to the attack is not clear. Police have warned the public that sharing the video is an offence and social media companies have said they are trying to scrub it from their platforms.

Huge piles of flowers were laid at sites near the mosques and crowds of people of all faiths gathered to pay respects.

At Christchurch's "Cardboard Cathedral" - built after the 2011 earthquakes that still scar this close-knit city - Dean Lawrence Kimberley held a service to stand "in solidarity with the Muslim community".

However, because none of the bodies have been returned to the victims' families because of the investigation, many having been unable to bury their dead within the 24 hours customary in Islam.

Ardern said victims would be handed over to families from Sunday evening.

At first, Mr Taylor and his colleagues had no idea what was happening, initially believing the alarms, sirens and general panic sweeping through the New Zealand city were signs of another quake, similar to the 6.2-level seismic disaster that destroyed massive swathes of the city in 2011.

Wearing a black scarf over her head, PM Ardern hugged members of the Muslim community at a Christchurch refugee centre, saying she would ensure religious freedom in New Zealand.

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Forty-eight people with gunshot wounds, including young children, have been admitted to hospitals for treatment.

Authorities said 34 people remain in hospital.

"Just helping people was his main thing".

Ardern said some were from Pakistan, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, Indonesia and Malaysia. Five other Pakistani citizens were still unaccounted for, he said.

Most guns do not require registration under New Zealand's Arms Act and police do not know "how many legally or illegally owned firearms there are in New Zealand", police said previous year.

"Terrorists don't have a religion", he said, adding "crazy people" had to be stopped.

Her fellow countrymen seemed to want to prove her right by volunteering acts of kindness.

Among those fighting for their lives is four-year-old Alin Alsati.

The shootings have raised new questions about violence being disseminated online.

CNN has not been able to independently confirm any information about the attackers or the alleged video. Police told her that he is not among the 49 fatalities.

"This is an issue that I will look to be discussing directly with Facebook", Ardern said.

But despite the horror of the Christchurch shootings, some local residents who AFP spoke with Saturday warned against any drastic moves on gun control.

Ardern said the suspect was a licensed gun owner who bought the five guns used in the crimes legally.

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