Hurricane Bud strengthening off western coast of Mexico

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Hurricane Bud is churning off the coast of western Mexico in the Pacific Ocean Tuesday as a Category 3 hurricane with winds of 125 miles per hour.

Hurricane Bud grew into a Category 4 storm with winds of 130 miles per hour off Mexico's Pacific coast on Tuesday.

Some additional strengthening is possible today, but a slow weakening trend is expected to begin by early Tuesday, June 12.

Early on Tuesday, Bud was moving towards the northwest at around 7 miles per hour (11 km/h).

The hurricane will churn up the ocean water along the Mexican coast, which could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions, the hurricane center said.

Regardless of development, this disturbance will likely produce locally heavy rainfall across portions of Nicaragua, Honduras, Belize, Guatemala, and the Yucatan Peninsula through Thursday, the hurricane center said. It's now churning up waters more than 300 miles west of Puerto Vallarta and 400 miles south of Cabo San Lucas. By the time Bud hits land in Mexico it is forecast to have weakened to below hurricane speeds.

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Both the Atlantic Hurricane Season and Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season are underway.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP flew over Hurricane Bud at about 4:45 a.m. EDT (0845 UTC) on June 11 and captured a night-time image of the storm.

Hurricane Bud, now swirling off the west coast of Mexico, is forecast to strengthen into a major hurricane and impact both Mexico and the Southwest U.S. over the next few days.

The National Weather Service's seven-day rainfall forecast.

Latest models show between three to four Category 3 hurricanes could form during the season, according to Tyler Roys, forecaster for AccuWeather.

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