Brexiters accuse Remainers of "grossest hypocrisy" over Brexit Bill

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We are not expecting any government defeats, but MPs will vote on an amendment saying the United Kingdom should stay in the EEA (European Economic Area), and dozens of Labour MPs are expected to back this despite being under orders to abstain.

"When the Government is able to set out an achievable, clearly defined path - one that has been properly considered, whose implications have been foreseen, and that is rooted in reality and evidence, not dreams and dogma - it should go to the people, once again, to seek their confirmation", he wrote. "It is, however, irresponsible to proceed as we are".

The Remainers are scared that the person who might win a leadership contest might be hardline, the Brexiters are scared that you would not get Brexit at all - and as long as both sides are scared, nothing changes.

Pro-EU demonstrators hold placards and wave flags as they protest against Brexit, outside of the Houses of Parliament in central London on June 11, 2018.

Ministers had mounted an unprecedented public negotiation with Tory rebels in the House of Commons a bid to avoid defeat over the terms of a vote by MPs on the final Brexit deal.

One government official said: "It's not over yet".

Opening debate on the flagship EU Withdrawal Bill in the House of Commons, Mr Davis warned that the "cumulative effect" of a series of Lords amendments would "make it impossible to deliver the smooth and orderly exit we want".

Brexit Secretary David Davis urged MPs to "respect the result of the referendum" that approved the withdrawal. We could end up with another rebellion when this amendment comes back to the Commons, probably next week.

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His communications with Cohen were "authorized by" and "made with the full knowledge" of Daniels, Davidson alleged. Daniels's former attorney, Keith Davidson , has come under fire from Avenatti and Daniels in recent weeks .

But in a last-ditch concession by the Government to swerve a revolt, the PM is indicating that it will put forward two of the three parts of Mr Grieve's amendment when the bill returns to the House of Lords.

Rebels have said they will challenge May's plans to leave the customs union with the EU during votes on other bills that will be brought back to the house some time before July 24.

Two days of debate on the laws that will end Britain's European Union membership have crystallised long-running divisions within May's party about the best strategy for leaving the European Union, bringing to a head issues that will determine the relationship between the world's fifth-largest economy and its biggest trading bloc.

Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer commented: "This vote was about ensuring parliament was given a proper role in the Brexit negotiations and that we avoid a no deal situation, which is becoming more likely with the divisions at the heart of this government".

It would also give hard Brexiteers the chance to "scupper a good deal", she claimed.

However, despite backing down, pro-Remain Tories signalled they would not be easily consoled by a compromise offered by ministers.

But after the prime minister personally assured a group of around 15 rebels that Mr Grieve's amendment would be partially adopted into the Bill before it went back to the Lords the rebels backed down.

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