Russian Dupes US Spies Of $100000 Offering "Compromising" Info On Donald Trump

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Reacting to the story on Saturday, the Central Intelligence Agency called it "fictional", saying the reporters who worked on it - The Intercept's James Risen and The New York Times' Matt Rosenberg - were the ones who were "swindled".

The payment, the report writes, was meant to be part of a $1 million payout to the Russian seller who claimed access to a wide-ranging collection of secrets including information on the stolen cyberweapons and material on Trump, which he said included a 2013 video of Trump with prostitutes in a Moscow hotel room. According to a notorious dossier compiled by former British spy Christopher Steele and part-funded by the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign, Russian Federation has compromising information with which to blackmail Trump.

"DRAIN THE SWAMP!" the president tweeted.

The seller, who was not identified but had links to both cyber criminals and Russian intelligence, tantalized the USA spies with an offer of the NSA hacking tools that had been advertised for sale online by a shady group called the Shadow Brokers.

Although an investigation was already underway back in Washington on the link between Moscow and the Trump campaign, the agents did not want to get involved in anything that smelled of the politics back home.

American intelligence officials who spoke with the Times insisted they paid the $100,000 to the Russian operative to get back stolen NSA cyberweapons and were not seeking the supposedly damaging intelligence.

And he kept pushing his offer of kompromat on Trump, including shady financial records and a sex video that the United States spies didn't really want.

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Multiple intelligence agencies have concluded that Russian Federation interfered in the 2016 presidential election in a bid to help secure Trump's victory.

Democratic Congressman Ted Lieu said in a tweet Friday that Risen's article "suggests the CIA Director fears getting information damaging to @realDonaldTrump that is being offered by Russians". "He took an oath to the Constitution, not to Trump".

The Times reports that American spies had their doubts about the Russian operative, who was known to have ties to Russian intelligence and cybercriminals, but chose to arrange a deal with him.

Trump has frequently criticized the Times, which has published numerous investigative reports about him and his administration, calling it a "failing" newspaper providing "fake news".

"I hope people are now seeing and understanding what is going on here".

Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion with Russian Federation. And this time the American operatives agreed, though with serious reservations, since it was obvious the Russian was connected to the Federal Security Department (FSB), the successor to the KGB.

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