Google's 'View Image' Button Removed to Deter Copyright Theft


Google is facing a major backlash after they bowed to pressure from Getty Images over the use of their search engines image indexing system.

Google came under fire for removing the view image option that allowed anybody to easily download any image found online, including photos they should have paid for.

Google no longer offers the "view image" option.

Getty Images is a photo library that sells the work of photographers and illustrators to businesses, newspapers and broadcasters.

Announced on Twitter yesterday by Google search liaison Danny Sullivan, the change follows a new agreement between Google and Getty Images, which had lodged a complaint against the search giant with the European Commission in 2016. The only problem with that is, instead of just loading the image it loads the website hosting it.

Critics said the change made Google Images harder to use.

Kelly overhauls White House clearance procedure
Kushner's lawyer seems pretty sure of that too, telling the Post that Kelly's new policy "will not affect Mr. Kushner's ability to continue to do the very important work he has been assigned by the president".

And all because Google has always been complaining about the photographers and publishers who claim that the search engine allowed users to upload more images for free. The deal is meant to put that accusation to rest, but Google also agreed to clearly show copyright information next to images and "improve attribution" specifically for Getty's images.

He noted that Google Images is created to help users find information when browsing images provides a "better experience" than does searching through text.

Getty has in the past accused Google of encouraging piracy by providing high-resolution copyrighted material, and discouraging folks from viewing images at their source.

"This is an bad update, user unfriendly 'update.' Literally degraded the product".

If you simply want to look through the image search results, that's a lot of extra time and data to download for every click.

Others pointed out that right-clicking an image in Google's Chrome browser and clicking "open image in new tab" replicated the missing function.